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We’re all Equal–in God’s Eyes

Posted in America's spiritual crisis, Uncategorized by Sam Hendrickson on 28 March , 2013

I am a sinner. You could see that in my life, if you were around long enough (short enough).

But, God doesn’t see me that way anymore–and He’s the One who made this happen, not me.

It’s as though a man was in a $5000 suit, and for a brief moment you look at him, and what you see causes you to say “wow–sharp suit, man!” But, then you keep looking, and his gaze is aimless, the cheeks are grayish green and sunken, his eyes are jaundiced and bloodshot, his well-coiffed hair is (more…)

A Teaching of Christ That is Difficult–but is for Us…

Posted in challenging human thinking, discernment, Lordship by Sam Hendrickson on 25 March , 2013

Luke 14:26  26 “If anyone comes to Me, and does not hate his own father and mother and wife and children and brothers and sisters, yes, and even his own life, he cannot be My disciple. NASB95

Think of that: Christ calls us to be His disciples and to obey Him, even if it means we have to choose to follow Him over choosing  our own families, our own spouse, our own children, our parent(s), or sibling(s).

Really?

Yes–really. Jesus made that choice Himself; this is evident in the Gospels. His Father’s “will” is what drove Him, moment by moment.

In this sermon, John Piper attempts to connect this teaching with Psalm 78, to speak to Gospel-living in areas of marriage, singleness and how parents are to view their children. It’s worth a read or a listen–for all of us. (With the usual caveats for areas where he differs in matters of faith/practice.)

http://www.desiringgod.org/resource-library/sermons/raising-children-who-are-confident-in-god

False and True Believers–Jonathan Edwards Style…

Posted in America's spiritual crisis, discernment, Holiness, Pastoral concern by Sam Hendrickson on 18 March , 2013

Therefore if there be no great and remarkable abiding change in persons that think they have experienced a work of conversion, vain are all their imaginations and pretenses, however they have been affected. Conversion is a great and universal change of the man, turning him from sin to God. A man may be restrained from sin before he is converted; but when he is converted, he is not only restrained from sin, his very heart and nature is turned from it unto holiness: so that thenceforward he becomes a holy person, and an enemy to sin. If, therefore, after a person’s high affections at his supposed first conversion, it comes to that in a little time, that there is no very sensible, or remarkable alteration in him, as to those bad qualities, and evil habits, which before were visible in him, and he is ordinarily under the prevalence of the same kind of dispositions that “I would not judge of the whole soul’s coming to Christ, so much by sudden pangs as by inward bent. For the whole soul, in affectionate expressions and actions, may be carried to Christ; but being without this bent, and change of affections, is unsound.” Religious Affections 126 – 127